1. In this world of human affairs, there is no worse nuisance than a boy at the stage of adolescence. He is neither ornamental nor useful. It is impossible to shower ………1……… on him as on a little boy, and he is always getting in the way. If he talks with a childish lisp he is called a baby, and if he answers in a ………2……… way he is called impertinent. In fact, any talk at all from him is resented. Then he is at the unattractive, growing age. He grows out of his clothes with indecent ………3………, his voice grows hoarse and breaks, and quavers, his face grows suddenly angular and unsightly. It is easy to excuse the shortcomings of early childhood, but it is hard to tolerate even unavoidable lapses in a boy of fourteen. The lad himself becomes painfully ………4………. When he talks with elderly people he is either unduly forward, or else so unduly shy that he appears ashamed of his very existence.
Yet it is at this very age when in his heart of hearts, a young lad craves most for recognition and love; and he becomes the devoted slave of anyone who shows him consideration. But none dare openly love him, for that would be regarded as undue indulgence and is therefore bad for the boy, so what with ………5……… and chiding, he becomes very much like a stray dog that has lost his master.

1) consideration, devotion, affection, recognition, tasks
2) childlike, grown-up, crisp, studious, brilliant
3) taste, waste, waist, haste, gait
4) self-conscious, vigilant, rebellious, lost, slow
5) praising, Devotion, beatings, distractions, scolding


2. Music means a pleasing modulation of sounds. The poets and novelists have used the term for figurative sense – as the music of forest, the music of the brook. Music has to do with ………1………, sounds selected on account of their musical quality and relations. These tones again, before becoming music in the artistic sense, must be so joined together, set in order, controlled by the human ………2………, that they express sentiment. Every manifestation of musical art has two elements: first a befitting selection of tones and, second, the use of them for expressing ………3……… and feelings. Hence, the practical art of music like every other fine art has its two elements an outer or technical, where trained intelligence rules, and teaching and study are the ………4……… means of progress; and an inner, the imagination and musical feeling, which can indeed be strengthened by ………5……… experience in hearing, but which when wanting cannot be supplied by the teacher or the laws of their action reduced to satisfactory statement.

1) sounds, voices, tones, rhymes
2) imagination, invigoration, intuitation, inspiration
3) ideas, sentiments, thoughts, experiences
4) measureable, impressive, principal, subsidiary
5) judicious, thoughtful, astute, canny



3. Little more than a hundred years ago, Seattle in America was called “the emerald city”. It was a quite lumbering town. The gold rush ………1……… the city into an industrial and commercial city of the Pacific Northwest. Situated between Elliott Bay and Lake Washington, it is bounded by the Olympic Mountains and the Cascade Range. The city withstood the Indian attack of 1856, anti-Chinese riots of 1880 and a ………2……… fire of 1889 and soon emerged as the gateway to the Orient and Alaska. In the 1890s, it was the chief supply depot for the Yukon and Alaskan gold rushes. World War II brought a tremendous prosperity to the city, with shipyards and the aircraft industry playing important roles in its ………3……… and advancement. In 1891, a four page paper was published by Alden J. Blethen with a daily circulation of 3500 which rose to 70000 in 1915. Mr. Blethen was a very hardworking American who dreamt that “The Seattle Times” would serve the city for centuries. “The Seattle Times”, has won Seven Pulitzer Prizes; it is ………4……… internationally for its quality reporting, freedom of the press, excellent printing, photography and design. The Company owns seven affiliate newspapers in Washington and Maine, a network of online news, information, and research and advertising web sites. It has the largest Sunday circulation network. Today, under the ………5……… of the fourth generation of Blenthens, more than 1.5 million people read “The Seattle Times”.

1) reserved, stagnated, transformed, created
2) disastrous, unfortunate, miraculous, hopeless
3) creative, modernity, modesty, existence
4) assumed, recognised, considered, appreciated
5) guidance, Light, pressure, assumption



4.Cars became practical vehicles and millions of Americans started buying cars for luxury and ………1………. Manufacturers competed to outreach each other in advancements in all aspects of automobile construction, and cars became more ………2………, comfortable and easier to drive. Four wheel brakes and car radios were new changes introduced in the automobile industry. Henry Ford was able to reduce the cost of cars to a level that most people could afford to buy. Car factories employed thousands of workers and new industries sprang up to service the automobile. Henry Ford became one of the richest men of America and the steel industry also boomed. The process of standardized mass production led to economic ………3………. The worker productivity rapidly increased. New industries such as petroleum and steel helped to create a host of new industries such as plastic and rayon production. In 1915, the total annual expenditure was $600 million, which grew to $2.5 billion in 1918. With increased worker productivity, workers earned higher wages and became better consumers and investors in the US stock market. A new cycle of ………4……… started, which encouraged Americans to build up debt in order to buy consumer goods.

1) convenience, accessory, support, waste
2) deceptive, responsible, reliable, pliable
3) amplification, Stagnation, spread, expansion
4) merchandise, buyers, marketing, consumerism


5.For many years before the Golden Gate Bridge was built, the only way to get across San Francisco Bay was by ferry, and by the early twentieth century, the Bay was ………1……… with them. In the 1920s, engineer and bridge-builder Joseph Strauss became ………2……… that a bridge should be constructed across the Golden Gate.
Many groups opposed him, each for their own ………3……… reasons: the military, loggers, the railroads. The engineering challenge was also ………4……… the Golden Gate Bridge area often has winds of up to 60 miles per hour, and strong ocean currents sweep through a rugged canyon below the surface. If all that weren’t enough, it was the middle of the Great Depression, funds were ………5……… and the San Francisco Bay Bridge was already under construction. In spite of everything, Strauss persisted, and Golden Gate Bridge history began when San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved $35 million in bonds to ………6……… the Golden Gate Bridge.

1) clogged, cleared, filled, choked
2) satisfied, compelled, proved, convinced
3) selfish, Greedy, stingy, kind
4) vast, gross, enormous, big
5) enough, rare, scanty, scarce
6) elevate, create, organize, construct


6. When ………1……… began on the Eiffel Tower, 125 years ago, many Parisians were far from enamoured, describing it as a ………2……… monstrosity that robbed the French capital of its beauty. But as the Paris marks the 125th anniversary of its construction – launched on January 26, 1887 – such reservations have long been forgotten. Built between 1887 and 1889 as the entrance arch for the Exposition Universelle – a world fair marking the centennial ………3……… of the French Revolution – the tower was originally meant to stand for 20 years, after which time it was to be dismantled. However, the wrought iron lattice tower located on the Champ de Mars survived thanks to its communications ………4……… and went on to become one of the world’s most popular monuments, ………5……… millions of visitors each year. Nicknamed “la dame de fer” (the iron lady), the Eiffel Tower has inspired singers, poets, painters, and filmmakers, while miniature Eiffel Tower souvenirs sit in millions of ………6……… around the globe.

1) trouble, work, assignment, project, task
2) useless, worthy, valuable, priceless, useful
3) jubilation, Ceremony, journal, celebration, competition
4) worth, value, damage, loss, cost
5) inspiring, Alluring, attracting, distracting, flailing
6) families, Locations, households, places, cities


7.Although some prevention efforts have succeeded, many analysts believe that the ………1……… solution to the global AIDS crisis is the development of a vaccine that will prevent people from ………2……… AIDS in the first place. Many researchers believe that the development of a ………3……… vaccine is possible and absolutely necessary in order to eradicate AIDS. However, many pharmaceutical companies do not want to invest in AIDS vaccine research because of the large expense involved and the belief that profits could not be made on the vaccines. Funding for research to develop an AIDS vaccine comes from several sources, mainly the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), UNAIDS, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. government agencies, and a few multinational pharmaceutical companies.

In the ………4………, AIDS continues to spread in the developing world. Although successes have occurred, many experts contend that much more needs to be done. They argue that the ………5……… to AIDS needs to be of greater duration, greater quality, and greater scope to reach the many areas of life which AIDS touches and affects.

1) first, next, intermediate, important, ultimate
2) passing, repelling, contracting, suffering, useful
3) remedial, curative, antidote, preventive, corrective
4) interim, ultimate, period, instance, meanwhile
5) answer, response, cure, prevention, reply


8.The savage, in spite of his membership of a small ………1………, lived a life in which his initiative was not too much hampered by the community. The things that he wanted to do, usually hunting and war, were also the things that his neighbours wanted to do, and if he felt an inclination to become a medicine man he only had to ingratiate himself with some individual already ………2……… in that profession, and so, in due course, to succeed to his powers of magic. If he was a man of exceptional talent, he might invent some improvement in weapons or a new ………3……… in hunting. These would not put him into any opposition to the community, but on the contrary, would be welcomed. The modern man lives a very different life. If he sings in the street he will be thought to be ………4……… and if he dances, a policeman will reprove him for impeding the traffic.

1) Families, Kingdom, Community, Country
2) ignorant, duped, joined, eminent
3) Skill, Technology, Management, Device
4) Sinning, drunk, Childlike, Singer


9.Circumstantial evidence suggests that if the basic building ………1……… of life are seen scattered in space, why not life itself? In the sixties, there started inter-disciplinary discussions about ………2……… life. The astronomers can tell what are the likely sites for life and how many of them are there in our Milky Way Galaxy of stars. Biologists have to decide what is it that ………3……… the life-mechanism and where among the various astronomical sites it is likely to occur. Then, the evolutionists have to say how a simple living system can develop over what time ………4……… into a complex intelligent species. Experts in artificial intelligence, communications and information transfer are needed to resolve the problem of contacting such species if they ………5………. And the social scientists need to assess the lifetime of an advanced civilization.

1) cells, spans, blocks, designs
2) alien, extra-terrestrial, native, celestial
3) imperils, invokes, stirs, triggers
4) span, gap, test, sequence
5) hold, exist, desire, die


10. A zero–ended rationalism about computers is that they only do what they are programmed to. The reasoning goes something like this: If one incorporates into a computer the capability to ………1……… the meaning and function of the symbols representing ‘two’, ‘multiply’ and ‘equals to’ then it would have no problem solving the equation :  2 x 2 =?. But how different is this really from what a child learns in grade school? It’s exactly the same. There can definitely be no ………2……… in certain children to be better in maths than others since arithmetic even at a lowly human level is, after all, only an acquired trait and acquired traits are not inherited. However, what has been missing so far in the environment of a computer is the role of a family and the nurture it provides for a ………3……… predisposition. This is because genetically, some children could have stronger musculature to become better cricketers or actors but only when given the ………4……… ambient training. The answer therefore lies not in suddenly blitzing a super computer’s hardware memory and logic bank its equivalent of musculature with the rules and ………5……… of some table game, but to bring it home as a baby.

1) arrange, recognise, explain, discuss
2) force, propensity, compulsion, necessity
3) certain, desirable, potential, necessary
4) necessary, desirable, certain, potential
5) practices, principles, rhymes, strategies