1.

Over the past decade we have seen an increase in the …………. of natural disasters worldwide. Through the media and for some of us, through first-hand experience, we have …………….. the awesome force of nature. In the recent past, we have had natural disasters created by the …………… in Southeast Asia and Japan, the earthquakes in Pakistan, Haiti and China, as well as ……………. Katrina and others in North and Central America. These caused unprecedented …………….. and great loss of life that have been etched in our minds due to their magnitude.

Some facts about natural disasters are available through statistics of the International Strategy for Disaster ……………, and the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters, a subsidiary of the United Nations. They show that there has been an increasing trend of natural disasters, ………………. over the last two decades.


2.

Panipat was of …………… strategic importance to the India of the pre modern era. It was located along the banks of Yamuna, and near Delhi. It used to be commonly said that whoever controlled Delhi, controlled North India. Delhi itself was located in an excellent position: between two agriculturally ………….. regions i.e. the plains of the Indus and the plains of the Ganges. All empire-shaking challenges in India would have been made against the ruler who controlled Delhi, thus, giving Panipat an important role in the battle.

India faced multiple …………… from the North and especially the North-west, and Panipat became the preferred battleground for such invaders and the Indian rulers to face each other. Notably, Panipat fell on the Grand Trunk Road built by Shershah Suri, which made it easy for ………………. to find their way there. Additionally, Panipat was an area with a terrain that consisted mostly of large plains, making it suitable for war. Also, its …………….. to the capital of Delhi made it easy for the Indian rulers to transport weapons, military and food supplies etc to the battleground, and still keep the capital ………. from the ………… at hand.



3.

According to an aggressive military …………… known as the Schlieffen Plan (named for its mastermind, German Field Marshal Alfred von Schlieffen), Germany began fighting World War I on two fronts,……………. France through neutral Belgium in the west and …………………mighty Russia in the east. On August 4, 1914, German troops under Erich Ludendorff crossed the border into Belgium, in ……………….of that country’s neutrality. In the first battle of World War I, the Germans assaulted the heavily …………………city of Liege, using the most powerful weapons in their arsenal–enormous siege cannons–to capture the city by August 15.




4.

Australia’s Aboriginal people were thought to have …………….. here by boat from South East Asia during the last Ice Age, at least 50,000 years ago. At the time of European ……………. and settlement, up to one million Aboriginal people lived across the continent as hunters and gatherers. They were ……………. in 300 clans and spoke 250 languages and 700 dialects. Each clan had a ………………. connection with a specific piece of land. However, they also travelled widely to trade, find water and seasonal produce and for ritual and ……………. gatherings.




5.

The Gallipoli Campaign of 1915-16, also known as the Battle of Gallipoli or the Dardanelles……………….., was an unsuccessful attempt by the Allied Powers to control the sea route from Europe to Russia during World War I. The campaign began with a failed ………………  attack by British and French ships on the Dardanelles Straits in February-March 1915 and continued with a major land invasion of the Gallipoli ……………….. on April 25, involving British and French troops as well as divisions of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC). Lack of sufficient …………….and knowledge of the terrain, along with a fierce Turkish resistance, hampered the success of the invasion. By mid-October, Allied forces had suffered heavy …………………. and had made little headway from their initial landing sites. Evacuation began in December 1915, and was completed early the following January.




6.

Many geographers argue that the increased ……………. of all natural disasters and temperature on Earth are nothing but a part of regular cycles on our planet. They say that similar cyclical changes in the past had taken us to the Ice Ages and had also …………. us out of them. Through …………… research we have found that cyclical changes do account for 30% of the underlying causes of the natural disasters we witness today (2016) and that they are in fact their basic cause. Spiritual science relies on …………….. and universal spiritual laws to explain the cyclic changes that are the cause of natural disasters and climate change. Here we will explain why cyclical changes happen on Earth from the viewpoint of spiritual science.

It is the law of nature that whatever has been created is sustained, and eventually destroyed. This is the law of Creation, Sustenance and ……………. For example, the Himalayan mountain ranges have been created, they will be sustained and ………… they will be destroyed. Thus, whenever something is created in this world, after a period of being sustained, it can be expected that at some point it will be destroyed. Only the …………., i.e., God, remains steady and unchanging.



7.

The Second Battle of Panipat took place on 5th November, 1556, between the Mughal Forces of Akbar and the army of Hemu. The war was ………… won by Mughal Forces. Bairam Khan with Akbar advanced through Thaneswar to the plain of Panipat, where thirty years earlier, Akbar’s grandfather, Babur had …………….. and slain Ibrahim Lodi. Himu lost his park of artillery in a  ……………engagement yet he faced his ………………. with 15,000 war-elephants and a vast number of troops far superior in number to those of Akbar.

The second battle was fought on November 5, 1556, and at the initial stage Himu successfully attacked the enemy on both wings. Bairam Khan …………… the ten thousand strong army from the rear, placed Ali Quli Khan, later appointed Khan Zaman, in charge of the centre, Sikandar Khan Uzbeg in charge of the right …………………. and Abdullah Khan Uzbeg in charge of the left wing. Akbar was kept at a safe distance in the rear by his ……………. Bairam Khan.



8.

On the Eastern Front of World War I, Russian forces …………….. East Prussia and German Poland, but were stopped short by German and Austrian forces at the ………………. of Tannenberg in late August 1914. Despite that victory, the Red Army assault had forced Germany to move two corps from the Western Front to the Eastern, ……………..to the German loss in the Battle of the Marne. Combined with the fierce Allied ……………….. in France, the ability of Russia’s huge war machine to mobilize relatively quickly in the east ensured a longer, more …………………. conflict instead of the quick victory Germany had hoped to win with the Schlieffen Plan.




9.

Gold was discovered in New South Wales and central Victoria in 1851, luring thousands of young men and some ……………………. young women from the colonies. They were joined by boat loads of …………………. from China and a chaotic carnival of entertainers, publicans, illicit liquor-sellers, prostitutes and quacks from across the world. In Victoria, the British governor’s attempts to impose order – a monthly …………….  and heavy-handed troopers – led to the bloody anti-authoritarian struggle of the Eureka stockade in 1854. Despite the violence on the……………., the wealth from gold and wool brought immense investment to Melbourne and Sydney and by the 1880s they were ……………. modern cities.



10.

With World War I stalled on the Western Front by 1915, the Allied Powers were debating going on the ……………. in another region of the conflict, rather than continuing with attacks in Belgium and France. Early that year, Russia’s Grand Duke Nicholas appealed to Britain for aid in ………………… a Turkish invasion in the Caucasus. (The Ottoman Empire had entered World War I on the side of the Central Powers, Germany and Austria-Hungary, by November 1914.) In response, the Allies decided to launch a naval ………………. to seize the Dardanelles Straits, a narrow passage connecting the Aegean Sea to the Sea of Marmara in northwestern Turkey. If successful, …………… of the straits would allow the Allies to link up with the Russians in the Black Sea, where they could work together to ……………..Turkey out of the war.




11.

The above-……………. natural disasters are grossly visible; hence we are aware of their existence. However, the increase in Raja–Tama has a far-reaching …………. impact on the body, mind and intellect of each and every human. This impact, being subtle and intangible, is not easily ………….. and humankind becomes aware of it only when this impact manifests as very gross climatic changes. Unfortunately, at this point, most of the changes are ……………….

Efforts made by world leaders at international summits like COP21 in 2015 and later only help in …………. the effects of global warming and climate change at a physical level. This is the part where the human race affects nature (i.e. the 19% in the chart above explaining the causes of natural disasters according to …………….. research conducted by SSRF). The rest of the effect of the human race on nature, which ……………… at the mental and spiritual level, has not been …………….. and therefore does not get addressed.




12.

Having ……………….. his position in Delhi and Agra, Hemu decided to send an army to the Punjab. But he was considerably delayed. Had he given the …………….. forces under Tardi Beg a hot chase, the prospects for Akbar would have considerably worsened. Nevertheless Hemu was so confident of his success that he committed a great blunder in sending his artillery along with the ……………….. without making due arrangements for prompt reinforcements when necessary.

Consequently, when Ali Quli Shaibani at the head of the Mughal vanguard attacked Hemu’s vanguard near Panipat, he scored a complete victory and captured Hemu’s artillery.When Hemu at the battle of Panipat ……………. Akbar at the head of his army it was the artillery he had lost that was ……………… by the enemy to hold on to its ranks. Despite this handicap, Hemu was able to route both the wings of the Mughal army and he …………………. to clinch the issue by bearing down the enemy centre by a ………………….. use of his war-elephants.




13.

3.Over the next two years, the Russian army ………….several offensives on the Eastern Front but were unable to break through German lines. Defeat on the ………………. fed the growing discontent among the bulk of Russia’s population, especially the poverty-stricken workers and……………… , and its hostility towards the imperial regime. This discontent culminated in the Russian Revolution of 1917, …………….. by Vladimir Lenin and the Bolsheviks. One of Lenin’s first actions as leader was to call a halt to Russian participation in World War I. Russia reached an ………………. with the Central Powers in early December 1917, freeing German troops to face the other Allies on the Western Front.





14.

The First World War had a devastating effect on Australia. There were less than 3 million men in 1914, yet almost 400,000 of them ………………to fight in the war. An estimated 60,000 died and tens of thousands were wounded. In reaction to the…………….. , the 1920s was a whirlwind of new cars and cinemas, American jazz and movies and ……………. for the British Empire. When the Great Depression hit in 1929, social and economic divisions widened and many Australian …………….. institutions failed. Sport was the national distraction and sporting heroes such as the racehorse Phar Lap and cricketer Donald Bradman …………….. near-mythical status.




15.

In the wake of the failed naval attack, preparations began for large scale troop landings on the Gallipoli Peninsula. British War ……………. Lord Kitchener appointed General Ian Hamilton as commander of British forces for the operation; under his command, troops from Australia, New Zealand and the French colonies …………….. with British forces on the Greek island of Lemnos. Meanwhile, the Turks boosted their defences under the command of the German General Liman von Sanders, who began…………… Ottoman troops along the shore where he expected the landings would take place. On April 25, 1915, the Allies launched their …………….of the Gallipoli Peninsula. Despite suffering heavy casualties, they managed to establish two beachheads: at Helles on the peninsula’s southern tip, and at Gaba Tepe on the Aegean coast. (The latter site was later ………………. Anzac Cove, in honor of the Australian and New Zealand troops who fought so valiantly against determined Turkish defenders to establish the beachhead there.)




16.

A Police veteran’s gut-wrenching plea for ……….. and understanding has touched thousands in the aftermath of a week of …………. in the US. Merri McGregor, a former police officer, took to Facebook to share her story. It included such ………… details of what she’s experienced that it will no doubt change how many view those working in the police force. She spoke about peeling a “dead, burned baby” from the front of her ………. shirt, and how she cried on the chest of a dead ……………….. who was unrecognisable from all the bullet holes. The events of last week’s tragic Dallas shootings, where a lone gunman killed five police officers and injured seven others during a street protest, led to an  ……………… of pleas for unity by fellow officers on social media.



17.

The Daily Prophet is a ……………… newspaper based in London. It is the primary source of news for British wizards. The current editor is Barnabas Cuffe, who works in the main office in Diagon Alley. Because of its ability to ……………. the minds of many in the British (and probably Irish) wizarding community, the paper has been known to have its content ……………. intentionally by the Ministry of Magic (which it has strong ties with) into telling the Ministry’s preferred …………….. of events. Unfortunately, the Prophet does not seem to have a lot of journalistic ……………., it has been known to be more concerned about sales than about factual accuracy. In some cases, the Ministry of Magic is highly …………….. on the Daily Prophet to assure the public that the Ministry of Magic is doing the right thing.



18.

Money, one of the earliest and most significant inventions of ……………, is essential to the development of………….. Without it there is only barter, a relationship between two people each of whom has something which the other wants. Money (which everybody wants) provides an intermediary substance, enabling the seller to choose when and where he wishes to become a buyer. All ……………… societies invest certain things with a special value – particularly livestock, and items of rarity or beauty. They are presented on ceremonial occasions such as weddings. The …………….. of large numbers of cattle or pigs is clear evidence of wealth and prestige. But these objects are not money in our sense, capable of easy use in everyday …………………….

The most often quoted example of primitive money is shells – in Africa cowries and wampum in America. The small cowrie shell, deriving from the Maldive Islands in the Indian Ocean, is a …………………. item in the civilizations of China and India from very early times. From India these attractive objects are carried along the trade routes to Africa. Similarly the American Indians use a small white ………….. shell for ceremonial gifts, embroidered on to decorated belts or other …………….. Europeans give the name ‘wampum’ to these precious items.




19.

According to ……………….., having a personality means showing a consistent pattern of behaviour over time. Researchers from the University of Arizona studied ……………….. of rock ants across the western US, both by following them in the wild and by taking whole colonies back to the lab. They found that certain …………… behaviours, like ……………… widely for food and responding aggressively to a threat, went together, and colonies further north tended to take more of these risks. The study suggests those more adventurous personalities could be an ………………… to the limited window of activity left by the long, snowy northern winter.




20.

For many people commuting is a ……………….. evil. Most see going by car or van as the ‘least worst’ option. This study by the researchers at the University of East Anglia challenges that ………….. It suggests walking, cycling or travelling by public transport can lift the mood. Crucially, it suggests those who ……….. from the car to an active commute feel better across a range of psychological measures, including ………………, decision making and the ability to face up to problems. The researchers say policies encouraging people to leave their cars at home could have a ……………. impact on public wellbeing.




21.

It was in the 1980s that many of us became aware that small …………… actions could harm the planet itself. Hairsprays were cited as one of the causes of the hole in the Antarctic ozone layer. People were told to wear sunscreen to …………. skin cancer as the layer thinned and more UV light got through. By 1987 world governments had agreed to ban most of the ozone-eating chemicals. The World Meteorological Organisation say at last the ozone layer is ……………… signs of thickening, although it will be a while before they know if the hole is actually healing. The same organisation …………….. earlier this week that climate change was heading in the opposite direction with ……………… gases in the atmosphere at a record level.